vieux nice – old town

The Old Town of Nice (Vieille Ville), also called Old Nice (Vieux Nice), lies just below as Castle Hill. To the south, it borders on the Promenade des Anglaises, while to the north it touches the Paillon River, or rather the Promenade of Paillon because the river has been flowing through the city in an underground channel since 1972. The names of streets in the Old Town are written in two versions: in French and in the local Nissart dialect (niçart).

The layout has barely changed since the 1700s, and it’s now packed with delis, restaurants, boutiques and bars.

Narrow cobblestone streets, tall colourful buildings and shops galore! Selling all wonderful french goods from cheeses to lavender. The main attraction is the Cour de Saleya (everyday market.) We visited the market twice, first on Monday when it seems to be a posh and upmarket flea market – with loads of hidden treasures and second-hand designer bags.

Then we returned on Thursday and the famous farmer market was back with an ocean of flowers, vegetables, fruit, art and the spices. I bought 4 spice mixes, very reasonable prices. we took a coffee break at one of the many cafes and restaurants that is bordering the market. For lunch is it quite difficult to get a table on the sunny side.

After that, we just walked the narrow streets and enjoyed the architecture of the buildings … Amazing!!! All the narrow streets make the atmosphere of the area magical.  We just walked … and walked, funny enjoy my feet didn’t mind that much, but I had taken a lucky pill before we left the hotel.

The atmosphere, sites, history, shops, restaurants & bars to suit all pockets, squares to sit and ponder life, and a nice mix of everything for everybody.

My favourite ice cream parlour in Nice, Fenocchio. They have about 60 different ice creams and sorbets. MAGIC!!! Located on Pl. Rossetti are also the most beautiful cathedral is located. A must when visiting Nice.

Cathédrale Sainte-Réparate de Nice (https://cathedrale-nice.fr/), the most beautiful church I ever visit – not that I have visited that many. Every detail in this cathedral is so exquisite. Like every flower is fresh … and there is plenty of them.

The original cathedral on the site, called St Mary of the Castle, was consecrated in 1049. In 1060, relics belonging to Saint Reparata (for whom the current cathedral is named) arrived in Nice. By 1075, a chapel dedicated to St Reparata was constructed at the foot of the castle.

The year 1900 marked the most recent addition to the cathedral, with the construction of new side chapels that replaced the former heavy baroque ornamentation. The cathedral was declared a minor basilica in May 1949.

The interior, also Baroque, includes ten chapels. Lantern 39 m high, lit by 8 windows decorated with stained glass in 1900: on pendants: stucco reliefs of the 4 Evangelists (1655) – under the dome: pulpit of the Second Empire, statue (1885) of Mgr Sola. The construction of a new cathedral (the current main building) took place between 1650 and 1865. In 1699, the new cathedral was officially consecrated while additional construction continued. It has been classified as a national monument since 1906.

We also visit some of the many small gift shops. They all offered nice products!

We enjoyed lunch at Pain&Cie … one of the best omelettes I ever had.

Visiting the Old Town of Nice can take 2 – 3 hours or longer. I think we spent totally 4 hours on Thursday and it would have become a lot longer if the sky hadn’t become dangerously dark.

“Towns are like people. Old ones often have character,
the new ones are interchangeable.”
Wallace Stegne

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