stena voyager – close to the end

voyager 17

Now under the past Easter holiday I decided to check up on my pride and joy, for many year – Stena Voyager, that like me have ended up here in Landskrona as finale destination and to be 100% recycled.

Haven’t been down to the harbor area since my visit on board together with our local newspaper in the end of May last year. The whole process was meant to take about 8 months and they are nearly there.

Voyager is now only an empty shell now and bit by bit they have started to pull “him” apart. The quayside was full of torn pieces of aluminum – the funnels are gone, but still in “his” last months looking great and mighty – but so sad to see this beautiful craft so vulnerable and completely tattered.

I have a feeling that this will be my last view of “him” – in  a couple of months will there be nothing left and a fantastic saga has come to an end, but I personal will have all the wonderful memories: stress, hard work, scream and shout, laughter, team work and bad jokes. Million stories to be told. But as, Stuart, one of our crew members said – gone, but never forgotten.

HSS - directferries.co uk

 

 “Everything that has a beginning comes to an end.”
Marcus Fabius Quintilian

HSS image provided by and thanks to directferries.co.uk

Advertisements

36 thoughts on “stena voyager – close to the end

    • Dia, it was sad to see, but still he kept up his appearance.
      A couple of months and the breath will be empty … that will be even worst. So this will my last visit.
      I wish you a wonderful week too. *smile

  1. Such an interesting story of a coming end, but I DO like the word ‘recycling’ . . . language I appreciate and can understand!!

    • Yes, Stena Line – the owner … have made a brilliant discussion with 100% recycling and that they do it themselves or at least have 100% control over it here in Sweden and not send it of to India or Pakistan, where they will have no clue where or what will happen during the recycling. They have really taken their responsibility.
      But very sad … because it one of the most high tech vessels on the 7 seas – but killed it was the fuel bill.

    • Barbara, it was the fuel bill that killed Voyager – when he was launched the oil price was low .. today nobody can afford to keep this magnificent and the most high tech vessel … in the world … sailing.
      So true what you’re say – doesn’t matter what we buy – it will be out of date in 6 months time. I can’t keep up.
      Nice of you to visit.

    • Yes, it was so mad at times … specially when the craft was new and everyone what to have the experience to sail in 40 knots.
      So stressful … and busy – and with only a turn around time of 20-40 min, there wasn’t much time anything else than … work .. work .. work.
      But there was some great moments too .. and horrific !!!
      Sad to see him like this .. but he will be turned into something else, maybe an airplane.

  2. ooh, ouch! Horrible to watch this, Vivi. Better to hang on to those memories and the trips you took together. Wish I’d been one of those passengers with my feet up 🙂 Salty sea dog hugs!

  3. Interesting, yet haunting photos!!

    How the mighty have fallen.. For me it is very disturbing to see the Voyager without a roof!! Clearly just business for Stena, but for those who worked and sailed on her… more sentimental feeling come out.

    Thanks for sharing. Good to see how the recycling is progressing.

    • Thank you so much …. it was the fuel bill that killed Voyager and the reason why nobody wanted to buy “him” neither. It was the same with the Concorde.
      I personal think that Stena has taken their responsibility when recycling in Sweden under their own control. It would have been terrible the process had been shipped off to Asia somewhere.
      I think we all are very happy over that we had a chance to been a part of HSS period.
      Thanks for the visit.

      • I watched the Voyager leave and arrive in Belfast port many times over the years..I took many photos of her sitting doing nothing whilst Stena decided her fate. Nice to have some closure on this and just not disappear as if she never existed.

      • It is very sad … and I had hoped that they would had exchanged Voyager with the Explorer on the Holyhead route, they talked about it .. but nothing happened.
        The Voyager just had a fantastic refurbishing before she was taken off route.
        It was so fantastic to be there and to start up those crafts – some nightmares with both the Explorer and the Voyager, but we got there, Explorer was the hardest because it was the first.
        Voyager we had 70% for free … when “he” arrived. Great memories and a fantastic product to work with.
        So you live in Belfast – I lived there too for 10 years. Just love the city … going back every November for a visit and to catch up with friends I left behind.

  4. Gone but never forgotten is certainly true…you have many wonderful memories. And just think of the many delicious meals that you prepared that contributed to the memories of others. 🙂

    • Yes, I have Karen – maybe they wasn’t that wonderful when they happen – not all of them. That little galley kicked out some serious amount of food and great food too.
      Had a brilliant team both in the galley and outside. They all created magic.

    • *smiling … it’s hard to forget the memories from the years I had with setting up Stena Line abroad. So much fun … and stress.
      Could tell so many stories – today they are all pleasant, but when I was in the middle of it … far from it.

      • Yes, that’s usually the way it works…with time the worst things fade and the best things last. We’re well done , humans, in that respect…

  5. Great ship was on his last sailing great to think I was the last paying customer to walk off it in 2011 gone but never forgotten 🙂

    • Wow, yes … its sad that .. its all over all. Last paying customer – what a honor that you took time to read ant commenting my post. Millions thanks.
      I hope you still travel with Stena, even if it’s not the same thing.

  6. Yea I travel all the time on the superfasts just not the same. Going to make the effort this year to have a trip on the hss explorer again hopefully she won’t turn out the same as voyager.

    • Henrik, thank you so much for the the link to the video – so sad .. it was bad enough stand on the quayside and taking the photo of the outside.
      At least “HE” will come to some use – in more than one way.
      My pride and joy, been there since … the blue print.
      Thanks again and I wish you a great summer, Voyager will not survive it – I guess.

  7. Hello Viveka, it is very interesting to see some updates of Stena Voyager. I hope you can keep us updated until her final day.. It would be great if you had any photos of Voyager from the early days when you worked onboard and blogged about some of your Stena Line days!

    • Shane, thanks for the visit … no I have never taken a photo from my working days from neither Explorer or Voyager, don’t ask me why … my camera was something in those days I only used for holiday.
      It was very sad to see the empty shell that HE is today and I’m not sure about that I will be going down to the shipyard again. It was heavy going to see this magnificent craft be torn to piece. It best to keep the memories as they are.

      • I’m not sure how long you were onboard for, but the 2008 refit changed the interior quite a bit. I have some photos of the Voyager in service that I took personally. If you are interested I could email a few of these to you. I am a huge HSS fan, though I never got the chance to work onboard lol

      • I was there from the blue print of the craft and I had a great input in the refurbishment 2009, when we move the Stena Plus. Such a great refit .. and I can’t understand why Holyhead didn’t take it over, because Explorer was tired looking inside already than. It was talk about it.
        Thank you so much for your offer …. My email address is – big.girl@bredband2.com
        I’m a big fan too … so great to have a part in the whole set up.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s